A Short Look at Typewriter History. NO, Really! In A NutShell.


In A Nut Shell!



            
 
 
 
 
  A Short Look at
       Typewriter History
       by J.D. Holiday

Another Stoles' Prototype
 
              I have always loved history of all types. It's usually inventions that I take the time to look at.
Sholes' One Key Prototype
I know, most people find this of no interest. But what can I say, I think if someone takes the time to come up with anything that would make others lives easier, they deserve to be admired. Even if it's just by me!
             You might not believe this, but there are quite a lot of articles written about the typewriter.
I found some articles that say that it all started in the 1900's when Christopher Latham Sholes, whose work on the typewriter is undisputed, asked for carbon paper at the Milwaulee Wisconsin Telegraph Company to use with his early gizmo he, Carlos Glidden and Samuel W. Soule would called the 'typewriting machine' in 1867.
A Christopher Latham Sholes's
machine
           As with many inventions that we so take for granted; the telegraph, the automobile, and telephones to name three, many people contributed to the invention of the typewriter. And many of these machines were listed as the 'first typewriter,' and almost all were slower than handwriting!
          I found that the whole invention really goes back as far as the fourteenth century. But in 1575, Francesco Rampazzetto, an Italian printmaker, invented a machine to impress letters in papers. And in 1714 the first patent was issued by Henry Mill, an English engineer. Many printing or typing machines were patented by inventors throughout the centuries. All those who worked on its invention that leads up to the present day took no less than one hundred prototype and more that 50 inventors worldwide. Amazing! Will we ever know all of these inventors names?
These Italians are among them:
              In 1802, Agostino Fantoni developed a particular typewriter to enable his blind sister to write.
Pellegrino Turri machine
              In 1808, Pellegrino Turri invented a typewriter along with carbon paper to provide the ink for it.
              In 1823, Pietro Conti di Cilavegna invented a different model called the tachigrafo or tachitipo.
              And then in 1829, William Austin Burt patented a machine. This machine used a dial rather than keys called an 'index typewriter' so unlike the other keyboard typewriters. He was never to find a buyer and the invention was never produced.
             Charles Thurber developed multiple patents starting in 1843 to aid the blind.
VinegarValentinePoem
The TypewriterMYER c1910-Postcard
            Another Italian inventor, Giuseppe Ravizza created a prototype his called Scribe, a harpsichord machine for writing with keys that the person could see what they were typing in 1855.
In 1861, a Brazilian priest, Francisco João de Azevedo, made his own typewriter using wood and knives.
              In 1865, a Rector from Denmark, Rasmus Malling-Hansen invented his Hansen Writing Ball which was manufactured in 1870 and was the first typewriter sold commercially and still in use up to 1909. Malling-Hansen was consided to be the inventor of the first "electric" typewriter, though the world would not see the REAL “first” electric typewriter which was produced by the Blickensderfer Manufacturing Company, of Stamford, Connecticut, until 1902.
(I had to add this since
 I write books!)
              Two of the men and staunch supporters of the typewriter as well as their own work on it leading to the eventual success of it in the 1880s were James Densmore and George W. N. Yost. They recognized the great result Sholes’s had made back in 1867 and purchased Sholes’s patents for about $12,000. Not a small amount in their day. They were successful in convincing Remington and Sons in New York who made guns, sewing machines and farm aquipment in their factory to manufacture the first typewriters known as the Sholes and Gliden Type-Writer. It was a QWERTYT keyboard and the one we still use today. At the time the Sholes and Gliden Type-Writer cost $125 each.
              I know there are many names I do not name here because to do so, I would be writing, or typewriting a book. A great thanks to all those who continue to image what could be for up until this inventions all writing by writers, authors, novelists, historians, speechwriters etc was written by hand.
© 2016  by J.D. Holiday
 
If you took the time to read this you might want to read more about the typewriter.
Here are some link for you to visit.
 
 
 
 
I added for fun. :D
 

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